LIVE TUTORIALS | FORM DRAWING LESSONS

With minimal video edits, you get to see from start to finish how I teach a form drawing lesson. This lesson works with my 6-year-old’s skill set, but also works for my 11-year-old’s ocean studies unit. Plus form drawing is a relaxing meditative activity that has far reaching benefits.

Form drawing is calming, meditative and enjoyable. It’s deceptively easy. Form drawing requires concentration and practice, but the process works to help children (and adults) focus the mind on the task, perfect it through repeated tries, all while enjoying the artistic aspect of the lesson.

Quick! Guess if I like this book or not. Okay, nevermind, on a scale of 1-10, how much do I like it? I think within the first few minutes of this video the answer will be clear. Though this is still only my first impressions of the book, but I can already tell you I love it for us and I think it’s an excellent resource for teachers and homeschooling families.

One of the biggest perks of this book is that it is a stand alone book that can work with a Waldorf curriculum or with any curriculum for any family wishing to add form drawing to their studies. The instructions are clear and easy and the book itself is simply gorgeous.

Check out the book haul in which I talk about Creative Form Drawing by Angela Lorde and other books.

Check out the complete playlist of all the form drawing lessons and tutorials we’ve done so far.

Find me on YouTubeTwitterInstagram and Facebook

With minimal video edits, you get to see from start to finish how I teach a form drawing lesson. This is a real time lesson, so it’s naturally long and there a many moments of quiet as is the natural tendency with lessons like this. This lesson was with my 6-year-old who hasn’t started any formal education yet.

A note on these lessons: Filming while doing a lesson is an unusually thing for us, and trying to orient all our main lesson books for the camera is unnatural. It’s harder to write this way, and it’s definitely not remotely ideal for my 6-year-old daughter who needs to do these lesson not just for the artistry, but for the hand mechanics of learning drawing and pre-writing skills. Also, I show the book and it is present for your benefit, but I would prefer to have the book away and for us to create the forms after I have familiarized myself with the forms.

Though we did the suggested pre-lesson activities, it was hard to film all of those and explain how they complement the lesson and how to actually do those activities.

One thing we haven’t yet done, but intend to do with the lessons is tell a story that represents the forms.

Lesson one was the introduction of the straight and curved line. Lesson two is patterns with straight lines. In lesson 2, we worked with long and short lines, and later we did patterns with increasing and decreasing lengths and lines going in horizontal and vertical orientations. We also introduced varying colors.

We use Stockmar stick and block crayons on a 9×12 inch main lesson book with blank pages.

Check out the complete playlist of all the form drawing lessons and tutorials we’ve done so far.

Check out the book haul in which I talk about this and other books.

You can find this book at Amazon and A Child’s Dream.

Find me on YouTubeTwitterInstagram and Facebook

Lesson one was the introduction of the straight and curved line. Lesson two is patterns with straight lines. In today’s lesson, we worked with long and short lines, and later we did patterns with increasing and decreasing lengths and lines going in horizontal and vertical orientations. We also introduced varying colors.

Lesson three focused on straight lines of varying lengths. We chose to do some embroidery as well as another representation of the form we drew. We used embroidery hoops, spare cloth and embroidery thread.

Here’s a tutorial for a tactile pre-lesson activity we did for our Form Drawing main lesson block. This activity was easy to do, but it did take about 30 minutes to prepare. You can do this project independently of the form drawing lesson or along with it and have the children help make these tactile projects.

Lesson four introduced nesting half circles similar to a rainbow. This would be an ideal opportunity to share a story about the rain, sunshine and rainbows. We alternated colors, made rainbows, and worked on small semi-circular shapes.

Lesson five continues the the semi-circular shape from lesson four. We continued to use our pre-lesson hand-on material we created in our previous lesson.

Lesson 6 focuses on half circles that nest and radiate out from the center of the page to fill the whole paper.

Lesson 7 continues the curved line with variations on the rainbow shape and curved lines that look like hills.

Lesson 8 introduces loops of various sizes that are all connected of various heights and widths.

This is officially lesson 9 for this main lesson block. To see lesson 1, click here.

You can see the other lessons for this Form Drawing Main Lesson Block.

Here are other videos related to First Grade.

Lesson one was the introduction of the straight and curved line. Lesson two is patterns with straight lines. In today’s lesson, we worked with long and short lines, and later we did patterns with increasing and decreasing lengths and lines going in horizontal and vertical orientations. We also introduced varying colors.

We use Stockmar stick and block crayons on a 9×12 inch main lesson book with blank pages.

To see the form drawing playlist, click here:

Form drawing is calming, meditative and enjoyable. It’s deceptively easy. Form drawing requires concentration and practice, but the process works to help children (and adults) focus the mind on the task, perfect it through repeated tries, all while enjoying the artistic aspect of the lesson.

Check out the book haul in which I talk about this and other books.

You can find this book at Amazon and A Child’s Dream.

Find me on YouTubeTwitterInstagram and Facebook

Check out the complete playlist of all the form drawing lessons and tutorials we’ve done so far.

https://youtu.be/viGm0Q1pgko

After taking a long break, we are back at doing our Live Form Drawing Tutorials. We picked up where we left off which might not have been ideal. After taking so much time off, my now 8-year-old daughter was hastey and out of practice. I decided to dive into the lesson without doing any preliminary warm up activities and that was a mistake. She also really didn’t like the story I told. Next time, I’ll keep the story fictional. She also didn’t like my story voice which admittedly sounded very unnatural. That combined with her displeasure at her work made for a poor first experience back into form drawing.

Form drawing is calming, meditative and enjoyable. It’s deceptively easy. Form drawing requires concentration and practice, but the process works to help children (and adults) focus the mind on the task, perfect it through repeated tries, all while enjoying the artistic aspect of the lesson.

Check out the book haul in which I talk about Creative Form Drawing by Angela Lorde and other books.

Check out the complete playlist of all the form drawing lessons and tutorials we’ve done so far.

Find me on YouTubeTwitterInstagram and Facebook

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